Feb
14

The Salary Cap Effect of The Mike Fisher Trade

If you follow country music, you know a bit about Carrie Underwood. What you may or may not know is that Carrie’s husband is ex-Ottawa Senator and new Nashville Predator Mike Fisher.

Lucky for you, this article isn’t about country music. No offense to anyone who enjoys some Garth Brooks.

The Predators acquired Fisher on Wednesday in exchange for a 2011 first-round draft pick and a 2012 third-round selection.

I’ll say this loud and clear: Mike Fisher is a well-paid NHL player. His current contract (signed in 2008) is for 5-years and worth $21,000,000.

That’s a lot of chicken.

Fisher is due $4-million this season, as well as the same amount next season. For his final season (2012-2013), Fisher will be paid approximately $3-million.

The official cap hit for each of Fisher’s contracted seasons? $4,200,000.

However, since the Predators acquired Fisher mid-season, they will only be responsible for $1,354,839.

According to the fine folks over at CapGeek.com, the Predators are projected to finish the 2010-2011 season with $51,013,844 in spending, which would be $8,386,156 under their $59.4 million cap limit. The Predators already had some wiggle room as far as finances are concerned.

On the other hand, the Ottawa Senators needed to make some salary cap room. Like the Predators, Ottawa has a $59.4 million limit. With the ousting of Mike Fisher from their books, the Sens are projected to finish the 2010-2011 season with $57,825,197 in spending, which would be $1,574,803 UNDER the limit.

Mission accomplished.

  • http://twitter.com/gopherstate Nate W.

    One thing the article doesn’t mention is that Nashville has had a self-imposed salary cap over the last few years which explains why they are so far under the salary cap (23rd in the league despite being a perennial playoff contender). In fact, this move is actually out of the norm for the Predators; a team which relies on shrewd drafting and development to keep costs down.

  • http://twitter.com/gopherstate Nate W.

    One thing the article doesn’t mention is that Nashville operates on a self-imposed salary cap and explains why they are so far under the salary cap (23rd in the league despite being a perennial playoff contender). For them to take on salary and give up a first-round pick is out of the norm for the Predators; if anything their success has been built on shrewd drafting and development keeping costs down.

    • Dominic Perilli

      Good point. Thanks for bringing that up.

      They have a nice team over there. The NHL is becoming more of a homegrown league in that teams like to develop young players rather than acquire superstars through trade; It’s almost like pro soccer.

      Fisher isn’t a superstar, but a good foundational player.

      • http://twitter.com/gopherstate Nate W.

        It’s something which becomes necessary in a salary cap world. If a team can draft well, they can spend their money elsewhere. However there are still teams which try to buy a Stanley Cup through free agency and veteran trades.

        p.s. My bad on the double post.

  • Cynthia Young

    What Hockey team is Mike Fisher paying for?