Top Safeties Malik Hooker And Budda Baker Sign With David Mulugheta Of Athletes First

Per a series of Instagram posts, former Ohio State University defensive back Malik Hooker and former University of Washington defensive back Budda Baker have signed with Athletes First for their representation in the 2017 NFL Draft. Both Baker and Hooker, widely regarded as two of the top safeties in the 2017 NFL Draft, will be represented by David Mulugheta.

Hooker announced his declaration for the NFL Draft via his personal Twitter account, after initial reports were that he intended to return to Columbus for his senior season. The redshirt sophomore was a unanimous All-American and led the Buckeyes defensive with three interceptions returned for a touchdown. On the season, he had seven interceptions to go along with 74 total tackles, including 5.5 for a loss and 0.5 sacks from the safety position. The New Castle, PA, native is listed as the number one overall safety and a projected top-10 pick according to WalterFootball.com. NFL Draft Scout has him as the number one free safety and a projected top-5 pick.

Baker is a 5’10” 192-pound junior out of Bellevue, Washington. He decided to forgo his final year of eligibility after a tremendous career in for the Huskies. The 2016 First-Team All-American brought home numerous awards, such as: First-Team All-Pac-12, Academic All-Pac-12, Semi-finalist finishes for the Bednarik Award, Lott IMPACT Trophy, and Jim Thorpe Award among others. He led the huskies with 71 total tackles, including 10 for a loss. He is ranked the second overall free safety according to NFL Draft Scout right behind his fellow Athletes First signee, Malik Hooker. NFL Draft Scout and Walter Football projects him as a second to third round draft selection.

As of September 2016, the Laguna Hills, California – based Athletes First was ranked the 15th most valuable agency, bringing in $39.7 million of commissions to that date, according to Forbes. With 87 clients, the value of the contracts under management was approximately $1.32 billion for 264 years.