Jan
22

Why Seattle Has Already Won

This guest post is written by Jason A. Davis, Esq. a Seattle attorney and sports fan.  Mr. Davis has previously contributed to the Sports Agent Blog. Follow him at @JasonDavisEsq1.

Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson (3) addresses the media after the 2013 NFC Championship football game against the San Francisco 49ers at CenturyLink Field. Mandatory Credit: Steven Bisig-USA TODAY Sports

Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson has proven to be a diamond in the rough. Image Credit: Steven Bisig-USA TODAY Sports

The rising star and quarterback of the now Super Bowl bound Seattle Seahawks is known to ask the simple question, “Why not us?”  And why not us? Is a city who has known more than its fair share of losses, lost franchises, and unfamiliarity with Championships, forever destined to be denied?  Why not us? The score of Super Bowl XLVIII is yet to be determined, but in my opinion, Seattle has already won.

Why? As I walk down Second Avenue in downtown Seattle, I am surrounded. Surrounded by city pride and a sense of unity I haven’t seen to date in this city. With the Space Needle at my back, a bank to my right, and Smith Tower looming to the south, as well as other buildings around me – all have something in common.  Each is proudly flying the “12th man” flag, a symbol of unity and pride of the Seattle Seahawks and their faithful fans. The team and the 12th man are inextricably linked. The one needs the other in equal shares creating a beautiful partnership.

I proudly wore my #12 jersey to both the divisional game against the New Orleans Saints, and the epic heavy-weight bout against the dreaded San Francisco 49ers. I also contributed to the 12th man voice (by losing mine) as we received yet another false start flag, and roared to another victory. In this jersey, I hugged and high-fived fellow fans I never met.  After winning the NFC title, we reveled with the masses outside the stadium.  My buddy and I cruised down Second Avenue in a 2013 convertible Corvette, freezing in the cold January wind, simply because “the ceiling couldn’t hold us!” We exchanged screams of “Super Bowl,” and “GO Hawks,” with pedestrians and other 12th men and women. Why not us?

Why us? Because the Seattle Seahawks exemplify the American spirit. They are a mix and match group who have grown together to be the best.  Russell Wilson, a second career quarterback, has truly shown to be a diamond in the rough. The secondary that has its own nick name and catchy hashtag (#LOB). Pete Carroll (who has the energy of a man 1/2 his age) has a smile and enthusiasm that breeds optimism. Sherman gathers more than his fair amount of criticism and commentary from folks who only know him from his audacious and brief sideline chat with Erin Andrews, but they ignore the swat that brought the Super Bowl. Showtime Tate lives up to his name.  Lynch continues to plow through the pile, and the rest of this unexpectedly historic team always backs up all the talk and hype. This team embodies the American ideal that a brunch of scrappers, with passion and adequate focus, can and will, defy the odds.

I grew up in Colorado, and by birth was a Bronco fan. I followed John Elway from my earliest memory. I experienced the agonizing defeats in the Super Bowls against the Giants, Redskins and 49ers. I also celebrated in joyous disbelief as we defeated the Green Bay Packers and the Atlanta Falcons. My father and two brothers still bleed orange and blue. However, I know I’ve adopted the blue and green of my city. I’m proud to see the team of my childhood face off against the team that represents my city.

The Seahawks have shown once again, the power of sport to bring hope, and unity to a city, state, and community. I’ll receive and exchange trash talk via texts with my brothers and father, and will tweet about the results with the rest of the nation.  But either way, I will smile to myself as I think of my fair city draped in the 12th man flag – unified in pride of OUR Seattle Seahawks – who have shown the world that it is “ok” to dare to dream, and ask … “why not us?”